realinterrobang (realinterrobang) wrote,
realinterrobang
realinterrobang

Quotes, Would You Like to Build My Apartment? Edition

The part I most enjoyed about it was that I didn't spend hours in bed going "Jesus Christ, will all you voices shut the fuck up, I *know* I have a headache, this is not news, let me sleep."
-- D Sidhe, Alicublog, comments, on taking Trazodone

It's easier for women to indulge men than it is to just say "fuck off, Jason" and deal with the fucking tantrum that follows.
-- @Mc_Heckin_Duff, Twitter

Don’t optimize your bugs; fix them.
-- Yonatan Zunger, “So, about this Googler’s manifesto.”, Medium

Ipso facto, omphaloskeptic pundits kowtowed to her diktat with a tsunami of ersatz hosannas.
-- FlipYrWhig, Lawyers, Guns, and Money, comments

I'm pissed! I'm mad as hell and I'm working on how I'm not gonna take it anymore!!!
-- Anna Hagemeyer, Facebook, comments



Ever notice you never hear any bitching about how there are no liberal bankers or hedge-fund managers?
-- LittlePig, Alicublog, comments

Pistol packing lesbians is going to be my band name and our first record is going to be called Terrorizing America.
-- MomSense, Balloon Juice, comments

[K]nowing your limitations isn't fashionable these days.
-- Katherine Immelman, Science-Based Medicine, comments

Murkowski told me that at every Alaska airport she went to over the weekend, people came up to her thanking her for her vote, some in tears.
-- @StevenTDennis, Twitter

As long as we’re valuing capital over labor, we have a future in store that’s owned by the 0.0001% where the rest of us get to pay for the privilege of being allowed to breathe their air and live on property they own. Where I get stuck at is how we get out of this bind–with people like the Mercers and the Kochs and the various Putin-orbit oligarchs holding the rights to so much of the world’s wealth, how do we devalue, divest, and otherwise claw back those resources to a place where we can use them for the good of society, rather than the plutocrats?
-- Boussinesque, Balloon Juice, comments

"There would be plenty of money to put out our fires if The Government hadn't spent it all on welfare!" :/
-- FlipYrWhig, Lawyers, Guns, and Money, comments

Depression isn't a sign of selfishness or ingratitude. Smiling doesn't help. Thinking of how much worse others have it than you certainly doesn't help. I honestly can't imagine how it ever would. Why would thinking of someone else's more horrific suffering ease my own? It's like telling someone they have nothing to cry about because they're not dying of dysentery while working 14 hours a day in a third world sweatshop. You can still be depressed without being a subjected to constant torture in a POW camp.
-- Liz Brown, “Gratitude Lists Are B.S. — It Was an ‘Ingratitude’ List That Saved Me,” Good Housekeeping

I enjoyed a post-Hobby-Lobby conversation with a family member who was acting triumphal that now business owners can run fiefdoms in accordance with their personal beliefs. I asked, "Is that what you want? Everyone who applies for a job has to consider the employer's religion? 'I don't want to work here, the owner is a Christ Scientist, so there's no health insurance? I hope the Jewish company hires me?' That's good for America?" His face fell about six steps into an "I never thought of that" pit. Which, lol, but also, HOW DID YOU NEVER THINK OF THAT?
-- Gromet, Alicublog, comments

[Y]our witty DM slide is actually just one more wave in a neverending ocean of mediocre cock crashing on the beach of a woman's day,
-- @Mc_Heckin_Duff, Twitter

I’m still haunted by a story I read here in LA probably 15 years ago now about a woman on Medicaid whose child had severe asthma that was difficult to treat. She took him to the ER so many times that the case worker decided that it was a case of Munchausen’s By Proxy and put the child in a foster home, because there was no way that a kid could have asthma that severe. You’ve probably guessed the sad outcome: the child had an asthma attack at the foster home and died, because the foster parents didn’t know how to deal with asthma that severe. The case worker got fired and the city got sued, but that mother’s child died because a supposed professional didn’t think asthma could be that severe and life-threatening.
-- Mnemosyne, Balloon Juice, comments

I don't think that man's mishmash of greed, prejudices, and things he heard on Fox five minutes ago are sufficiently coherent to warrant the term "ideology". In the (reversed) sense of distinction between astronomy and astrology, I propose "ideonomy" as an alternative.
-- wjts, Lawyers, Guns, and Money, comments

Fort McMurray is a city of extremes. It’s extreme remoteness. Extreme wealth. Extreme boom. Extreme recession. Extreme cold. There are a lot of extreme things to navigate.
-- SOS Health and Wellness Manager Linda Sovdi, quoted in Omar Mouallem, “Oil, Heartbreak, And Manhood: Behind The Mental Health Crisis Of Alberta's Oil Workers,” Buzzfeed News

When there is no evidence of efficacy, then a treatment is all risk, no benefit.
-- David Gorski, “Naturopathy and dubious compounding pharmacies: A deadly combination,” Science-Based Medicine

Have you ever read The Mismeasure of Woman by Carol Tavris? She tells a brief story of a scientific conference she went to where someone presented a paper about menstruation, and a male scientist complained because men weren’t even discussed. In a presentation about menstruation. I swear, sometimes I think would go join a women’s collective if I weren’t already happily married to living proof that not all white guys are idiots.
– Mnemosyne, Balloon Juice, comments

It's time for someone to challenge the governing premise we've lived under for the past almost 40 years. Does it really make *sense* that the very top policy priority, in a free and democratic country, would be to make it easy for those who already have more than enough wealth to live in luxury for 10, 50, or 100 lifetimes, to grab even more? … I want to see someone out there running making the explicit argument that policy that promotes wealth concentration is harmful to the economy and to democracy itself. The evidence is all around us. Stop blowing smoke about how it's because of "offshoring" or "the service economy." It's not. It's because of policy that was specifically designed to deliver us to the point we're at right now.

High tax rates on high wealth aren't just a way for the country to pay its bills and pay off its debts and provide a better life for all of us. They're also the most important protection we can offer for democratic government. Stop running from the idea that there's anything "bad" or "immoral" about taking over half of a billionaire's annual income. He doesn't need more and he wouldn't have what he has if not for laws that tilt the playing field in his favor and allow him to rake profit off of workers being paid slave wages. It's time to stop trying to appease the ultra-wealthy monsters we've created, and take the battle directly to them.
-- jennofark, Alicublog, comments

[Trump] possesses a narcissistic shield the likes of which the world had never seen. I mean, seriously, he just experienced the humiliation of the head of the BSA apologizing on his behalf, and effortlessly transmuted this into a conversation in which same person thought this was the greatest thing he ever experieinced. His total and utter immunity to to humiliation or perspective is as close to a superpower I've ever saw anyone exhibit in real life.
-- humanoid.panda, Lawyers, Guns, and Money, comments

[T]his is addressed specifically to the author of this manifesto.

What you just did was incredibly stupid and harmful. You just put out a manifesto inside the company arguing that some large fraction of your colleagues are at root not good enough to do their jobs, and that they’re only being kept in their jobs because of some political ideas. And worse than simply thinking these things or saying them in private, you’ve said them in a way that’s tried to legitimize this kind of thing across the company, causing other people to get up and say “wait, is that right?”

I need to be very clear here: not only was nearly everything you said in that document wrong, the fact that you did that has caused significant harm to people across this company, and to the company’s entire ability to function. And being aware of that kind of consequence is also part of your job, as in fact it would be at pretty much any other job. I am no longer even at the company and I’ve had to spend half of the past day talking to people and cleaning up the mess you’ve made. I can’t even imagine how much time and emotional energy has been sunk into this, not to mention reputational harm more broadly.

And as for its impact on you: Do you understand that at this point, I could not in good conscience assign anyone to work with you? I certainly couldn’t assign any women to deal with this, a good number of the people you might have to work with may simply punch you in the face, and even if there were a group of like-minded individuals I could put you with, nobody would be able to collaborate with them. You have just created a textbook hostile workplace environment.
-- Yonatan Zunger, “So, about this Googler’s manifesto.”, Medium

He has no historical view. He is only dealing with these issues now, and seems to think the world started when he took office. He thinks that NATO existed only to keep the communists out of Europe. He has a similar attitude in Asia-Pacific with Japan, ignoring that the US basically wrote their constitution.
-- diplomat quoted in Alberto Nardelli, “This Is What European Diplomats Really Think About Donald Trump,” Buzzfeed News

[C]hildren under about four are capable of noises that make me wish the migraine was an aneurysm.
-- D Sidhe, Alicublog, comments

My great grandmother died of asthma in 1917, in September. She was 69 years old, from a family that tended to live into their 90s.
-- opiejeanne, Balloon Juice, comments

My position, for the record: Nuclear tipped North Korean ICBMs are somewhat annoying and mildly disconcerting, but they do not approach posing an existential threat to the United States. With each new missile project North Korea’s deterrent is becoming steadily more secure, but Pyongyang has *never* indicated a predilection for suicidal behavior. The real problem with North Korea’s nuclear weapons remains a regime-collapse scenario, in which elites either lose control of the weapons or act in extremely risk-acceptant fashion. Panicking about North Korean missile and nuclear programs, at this point, only makes things worse. North Korean ICBMs are not good, but they’re clearly tolerable.
-- Robert Farley, “The Missiles!”, Lawyers, Guns, and Money

"I've been making gratitude lists," I said. "I'm really trying to look on the bright side." "Screw that," [my therapist] said. "Stop doing that immediately. It's last thing you need. You need to make an Ingratitude List. You should be PISSED. Your life's honestly kind of sh*tty right now. I'm not saying there's no bright spots, but you need to stop trying to pretend you're not in pain. You need to make a "This Sucks Ass" list.” I started writing my first Ingratitude List and my pen was flying across the page like an artist suddenly touched with divine inspiration. I festooned my list with every obscene curse word describing every misfortune that had fallen in my path, big and small: deaths, illnesses, disappointments, repressions, oppressions, taxes, loans, insensitive comments, missed opportunities, betrayals from assholes I had misjudged as friends who were now millionaires, empty promises from people to whom I'd given my trust and confidence, aches, pains, worries, panics, and one unshrinkable hemorrhoid. I drew a picture of the construction site that had been going on across the street from my bedroom for two years, burning to the ground in flames. I told the next person on the street who told me to smile: "Go f**k yourself, you don't know my life dickhead."
-- Liz Brown, “Gratitude Lists Are B.S. — It Was an ‘Ingratitude’ List That Saved Me,” Good Housekeeping

Whether or not Anne Frank was right about people being good at heart, they sure aren't good at brain.
-- @Nerdylation, Twitter

I wish we'd taken our much-loved third's gun away from him. We didn't, and we failed the family that we were, to end up the diminished family that we are. If you know someone who is irrationally suicidal, or who even has those moments, take their guns away, even if you can't do anything else. Encourage them to keep their guns at the range. Because suicide without a gun is hard, and complicated, and takes longer, and often fails. There's time for second thoughts. There's an afterward in which they might be receptive to getting help. If you want to keep them, don't let them keep their guns handy.
-- D Sidhe, Alicublog, comments

For some lefties, “Israel has a right to exist and defend itself” is even a bridge too far.
-- Major Major Major Major, Balloon Juice, comments

It's always McMartin Preschool in America.
-- sigaba, Lawyers, Guns, and Money, comments

The task was simple enough for a crane operator of 11 years. Chris Johnson, a heavily pierced and tattooed 30-year-old, was to lift a 5,000-pound lay-down of piping and then set it back down. The crew was constructing modules for a refinery in the Alberta oil sands, the industry in which Johnson has worked since shortly after he finished high school. But the load was 80 feet away and Johnson, sitting in the cab of a 30-tonne crane, couldn’t make out what was happening at the end of his hook. He stretched his right arm, inked with black stars and winged skulls, and pulled the lever back slowly. No sooner had the hook lifted did the boom get pulled toward the ground. The weight of his load shifted. The crane started tilting forward, taking Johnson down with it.

His mind acted fast. He ejected the hook, the load dropped, and the crane fell back into place. In trade terms they might call this the “pucker factor” — the sketchier the situation, the tighter your asshole puckers — and this had a pucker factor of 10. But Johnson knew the feeling better as a nervous breakdown. What took all of three seconds — five seconds, max — felt like hours in free fall when his equilibrium dropped. He hopped out of the cab hyperventilating, both relieved and confused to be standing, and told his foreman he needed to get to a hospital immediately.
-- Omar Mouallem, “Oil, Heartbreak, And Manhood: Behind The Mental Health Crisis Of Alberta's Oil Workers,” Buzzfeed News

Not all ideas are the same, and not all conversations about ideas even have basic legitimacy.
-- Yonatan Zunger, “So, about this Googler’s manifesto.”, Medium

Oh, God, my life has been a sham of a mockery of two shams of a fig leaf of a joke. I've ... I've failed my saving throw versus "pathetic." [Breaks down sobbing]
-- mds, Alicublog, comments, in response to a string of D&D jokes

[D]espite what some may think, the TV is not an eating utensil.
-- Chabad.org staff, “Laws of Yom Tov,” Chabad.org

I have an acquaintance who is (or seems) pretty smart who thinks the Port Authority blew up the World Trade Center on 9/11. Not Bin Laden's bunch, not Bush, not the CIA, not "the Jews." The Port Authority..
-- woodrowfan, Lawyers, Guns, and Money, comments

Miskuski was in a pit of despair. A month later, aged 35, he killed himself. During his funeral service, Angel noticed funeral home staff crying alongside her. “I talked to them after, and they said, ‘This is the seventh young man that we’ve held a funeral service for in the past two weeks.'”
-- Omar Mouallem, “Oil, Heartbreak, And Manhood: Behind The Mental Health Crisis Of Alberta's Oil Workers,” Buzzfeed News

[M]y late mother and uncle both were bedridden for over a year with severe asthma as children.
-- Laura, Balloon Juice, comments

When all you have is a lighter and a can of gasoline, every problem looks like an inconveniently placed orphanage.
-- Helmut Monotreme, Alicublog, comments
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